College panel on Confederate Statues Features Zero Proponents

Virginia State Capitol - Richmond, Virginia

campusreform.org

A recent Middle Georgia State University panel on the appropriateness of Confederate monuments featured zero professors who were willing to defend such statues.

The panel, called “Monument Forum: Artifacts, History, Heritage,” included three professors from various universities across the country, though not one held the position that the monuments should remain erected.

[RELATED: POLL: Most millennials just fine with confederate monuments]

In fact, The Telegraph reports that one person in attendance, Johnny Nickles, told the speakers that he was “a little disappointed” with the event because “all three of [them] have the same opinions.”

“I don’t believe slavery was the reason for the war,” he continued to laughs from audience, instead suggesting that the motivating force was about states’ rights. “I am totally in favor the monuments. We have a monument of Rosa Parks now; a statute of Otis Redding.”

In response, however, Fort Valley State University professor Mark Smith objected that “historical scholarship is pretty much in agreement” on the issue, with one audience member claiming that she had never even heard of people debating the issue until she “came down south.”

Nickles’ objections were in response to the one-sided nature of the preceding panel, with The Telegraph noting that Smith began the discussion by asserting that he disagrees with having such monuments in public spaces because the Civil War was primarily about slavery and white supremacy.”

“So, really, any public monument to soldiers and leaders of the military of the Confederacy is a monument to these things,” he claimed. “Given what they symbolize, I don’t think they’re appropriate for these spaces.”

The Telegraph adds that the two remaining professors on the panel were in complete agreement, suggesting that the monuments should either be moved to a museum or have opposing monuments placed “right alongside them.”

“Either solution I think would make our public spaces more inclusive, and it seems to me like that’s what we should be doing,” Smith suggested, as, according to WGXA, Middle Georgia State University Professor Niels Eichhorn agreed.

“These monuments were not put up as a moment for reunion,” Eichhorn said. “It’s a monument to show, ‘No we didn’t learn from the war. We didn’t want to embrace racial equality.'”

Notably, a recent poll found that 60 percent of the population, including a plurality of blacks, agree with keeping such monuments in place.

Read more at Campus Reform

They Don’t Hate the Confederacy, They Hate America

imagesMost of the people fueling the outrage at the hundreds of Confederate memorials throughout the United States since the Charlottesville riot would just as soon pull down the monument of a Union general, or even a Founder of the nation. The issue at hand is not the right of state secession (an issue most of the historically illiterate anarchists have never studied), but whether the U.S. is legitimate nation.

President Donald Trump caught a firestorm of criticism from the media for condemning the violence that the white nationalists and the Left-wing counter-protesters engaged in because the media was incapable of understanding that he was creating a moral equivalency of their acts of violence, not their beliefs. It didn’t take long for the social justice warriors to take their hate and vitriol out on stone and marble structures, infamously pulling down a statue in Durham, North Carolina, resulting in numerous felony charges. Dozens of anti-Confederate protests on campuses and in cities across the nation have erupted since, and in Baltimore and Austin, authorities had Confederate monuments relocated under the cover of darkness.

But, is it really the Confederacy that gets under these people’s skin? As it turns out, the vandals who pulled down the Durham statue are not just concerned citizens who worry that the statue could be a rallying point for white supremacists. They were led by activists of the Workers World Party, a socialist organization dedicated to “fighting for a socialist revolution in the United States and around the world.”

So, they were, your basic boring Reds who didn’t get the memo that world socialism is so 20th century.

In Trump’s duel with the media on August 15, he pointed out that the hysteria over the Robert E. Lee statue is only a stepping stone. “I wonder,” he asked the Left-leaning media: “Is it George Washington next week, and is it Thomas Jefferson the week after?”

It didn’t take the cultural Marxists long to answer that question. Since the Charlottesville street fights, the monuments and memories of Christopher Columbus, Thomas Jefferson, and even the Great Emancipator himself Abraham Lincoln have come under attack. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio is even appointing a special committee to look at the monument issue. One of the things that committee will consider is whether to dig up and relocate poor Union General Ulysses S. Grant, who also happened to be Lee’s nemesis over an anti-Semitic order that Grant gave once while under Lincoln’s command.

The fact is, those protesting the Confederate monuments have no love for the Union. They view the U.S. as an inherently racist and white supremacist nation the way Hilary Clinton described Trump’s “basket of deplorables:” irredeemable. Although history isn’t exactly their strong point, they understand that the views of the Confederates was not that different from those of the Union. They were all people of their age and their views on practically anything (including ethnicity) would have likely been more similar to foreigners of their time than to Americans in the 21st century.

The Charlottesville violence is simply an open window for these cultural revolutionaries. Their financial backers want an economic, socialist revolution and just like Antonio Gramsci, they understand the best way to bring that about is to facilitate a cultural revolution.

It’s much easier to get people to support the overthrow a system of government if you can convince them to hate the people who instituted that government.